Does Your Prospective Employer Value Your Safety in the Workplace?

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As a 30, 40, 50 or even 60-something, it’s not uncommon to change your career path. In fact, employees change their career path or jobs about five to seven times during their lifetime, on average.

Whether you went back to school to get a Master’s in a field of study you love or you’re newly retired and still want a part-time job to keep you busy, the workforce is full of new employees in your age demographic.

As soon as you go through the interview process and receive a job offer, you might be eager to say yes to the job offer as soon as the company proposes it. Before you accept the job it’s important to consider a few things. Even if the salary and benefits package is everything you’ve ever wanted, you’ll need to think about the company regarding safety and how it benefits your overall health and safety.

1 Does Your Prospective Employer Value Your Safety in the WorkplaceBefore you say yes, take some time to think about these safety and wellness factors.

The Company’s Reputation

You may have done a little research on the company to prepare for your interview, but did you learn anything about the company’s reputation? Do a little Internet research and see how the general public perceives them or if there are online reviews from former employees.

2 The Company’s Reputation

Look into things like workplace safety, morale, and environment. Depending on what you do or don’t find out, carefully consider the information you read. Some reviews could be from an angry former employee, while other reviews could indicate a serious red flag about the company.

Workers’ Comp and Workplace Safety

Whether you’ll be working at a desk 40 hours a week or with heavy equipment, workplace safety is essential. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, in 2016, there were 2,857,400 recordable cases of nonfatal injuries and illnesses in the private industry.

Of the total cases, there were 317,530 sprains and strains, 154,180 injuries to the back, and 229,240 falls slips, or trip. There were also a recorded 892,300 days missed from work due to work-related injuries.

3 Workers’ Comp and Workplace Safety

As you can see the most common non-fatal injuries are not industry specific which means you’re just as likely to trip in the office than you are at a construction job site. The best way to avoid such injuries is to work for a company that has workplace safety plans in place, frequent training, updated safety equipment, and Workers’ Compensation Insurance for every employee, regardless of their position.

If your prospective company doesn’t have Workers’ Comp coverage for employees, you should look for a job elsewhere because the lack of coverage is a sign that employee safety is not valued.

How Are Traumatic Events Handled At The Company

Active shooters and other threats to a company are a sad reality that many people worry about on a daily basis. Not only should a company keep employees from sustaining work-related injuries, but they should have a plan in place for shooters and threats to the well-being of all employees.

Before you accept a job offer with the company, ask if there are safety plans in place for a traumatic and life-threatening event. Are guns banned from the workplace? What are the procedures for dealing with threats? Does the company offer support to people who need support after traumatic events?

There’s never a guarantee that you will be completely safe in your new job, but you should work for a company that values employee safety and wellbeing and will do anything they can to provide the best for their employees.

Source: Safety HUB

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